Category Archives: Brexit

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EU Sanctions: European Commission President Pushes for Greater Resilience, Proper Enforcement

Ursula von der Leyen, the new president of the European Commission, has called for ‘new proposals to ensure Europe is more resilient to extraterritorial sanctions by third countries and to ensure that the sanctions imposed by the EU are properly enforced…throughout its financial system.’ See September 2019 Mission Letter from President von der Leyen to Valdis Dombrovskis, … Continue Reading

UK Election Results: Brexit, but in What Form?

The substantial gains made by the ruling UK Conservative Party in the general election on 12 December 2019 mean that, barring the unexpected, the UK will leave the EU on 31 January 2020. The Conservative government now has sufficient majority to drive parliamentary approval of the draft withdrawal agreement renegotiated with the EU by UK … Continue Reading

Brexit: Unlawful Prorogation Means Continued UK Parliament Scrutiny of Brexit Plans

In a historic decision issued 24 September 2019, the UK Supreme Court ruled that the UK prime minister, Boris Johnson, acted unlawfully when he advised the Queen to prorogue, or suspend, the UK Parliament for five weeks, until 14 October 2019. The effect of the very clear and unanimous decision of the 11 Supreme Court judges … Continue Reading

Brexit: Can the Remainers Stop a No-Deal Brexit?

Brexit has driven fault lines through British politics as seen at no time since the 1680s. Fervent ‘leavers’ and fervent ‘remainers’ can be found in both of the main political parties, although most favour various compromise options in between. This is reflected in the composition of the UK Parliament and has resulted in an impasse, … Continue Reading

LIBOR and “No-Deal” Brexit

One of the consequences of a “no-deal” Brexit would be that the United Kingdom would no longer have access to the European financial market. This would affect LIBOR as a trusted and widely used benchmark. LIBOR vs. EURIBOR Currently, two relevant benchmarks exist in the European Union: LIBOR and EURIBOR. LIBOR stands for “London Interbank … Continue Reading

Brexit Brinkmanship

It is now less than two months until 29 March 2019, the date set for the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. At this late stage, the terms of the UK’s withdrawal have still not been settled, and the Brexit issue remains clouded in uncertainty. As a result of a vote in the UK Parliament 29 … Continue Reading

Brexit Consequences for Governing Law and Jurisdiction Clauses

Parties who do cross-border business often declare English law applicable in commercial contracts, accompanied by a jurisdiction clause making the English courts (exclusively) competent to hear claims arising out of the business relationship. In light of Brexit, the question arises what the position of decisions given by the English courts will be in the EU, … Continue Reading
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